Sunday, March 18, 2012

Right as Rain

Northern California has been dry as a bone this winter.  Up until last week, I'd resorted to hand-watering and even turned the irrigation back on the fava beans and raised beds.  The rain has come at last though and what March showers do to my over-wintered flowers, well, I couldn't resist the urge to snap a few.

This little flower pops up every spring and spends the rest of the year, blanketed under the earth as a bulb.  They are all over my yard.  Anyone know what they are called?

I'm not the only one who loves borage.  It attracts bees like nobody's business.  They venture out for their hit of borage even in between rain storms.

Speaking of borage, I had thought this was comfrey (which I had planted there, under the apple tree) but I'm fairly certain it is white borage, which I also planted around this and other trees.  Borage grows SO well from seed and reseeds so easily, you only need to invest in one packet of borage seeds and you are set for life.

Ahhh, the Indian blanket wild flower.  Be still my heart.  This beauty was part of a wild flower mix that I planted last spring.  It overwintered fairly well and what flowers did go to seed, I kept the seed so I can plant more again this year.

Calendula is right up there with borage for a re-seeder and a multi-use plant.  I have clumps of calendula all over my yard.  It has many uses, including edible flowers, medicinal uses and making a lovely lotion.

With plenty of rain, my nasturtium have reseeded and grown and grown.  I love how their large leaves cup the rain drops.

Loving succulents these days for my pots.  That way, if I forget to water, oh well!


* I'm linking to Tuesday Garden PartyGarden Tuesdays,Homestead Barn Hop and Farmgirl Friday with this post.
* Join the Facebook page where things are growing every day.

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17 comments:

Jennifer @noteasy2begreen said...

I think I may have sighed in relief and happiness when I heard the rain pounding down on the roof this weekend. I missed that sound! I don't garden, but I love seeing photos of yours. Love the nasturtium leaf especially. :)

Ellen said...

I saw your first picture and got all excited thinking you were going to tell me what these are, because they're all over my yard too! There were confined to a smaller patch when we moved in 20 years ago, but through various means they have spread. Do your smell like onions a bit? They're beautiful but a bit hard to get rid of when they crop up in places you do NOT want them! I also have calendula and borage out with this rain.

Green Bean said...

@Jennifer - I felt the same way! In fact, I am worried that, now the rain has stopped, it will never come again until next year.

@Ellen - Yup, those are them! They even look like onions when you pull them up. I haven't a clue what they are but hopefully someone will respond who does. Are you in Nor Cal too?

Pam said...

Do you grow borage for it's flowers? Is it an herb? Thanks for linking up to Garden Tuesday!

Athena at Minerva's Garden said...

Your pictures are lovely, and I just "like"d your blog on Facebook! You are in a warmer climate than I--your plants are much farther ahead in the growth cycle than mine are at present. I have forsythia and viburnum, plus little ephemeral bulbs and primroses at the moment going at it! You are right about borage and it reseeding, but I love it, too, and especially like to make sure it's growing all around my vegetable beds so the veggi's all get pollinated.

Athena at Minerva's Garden said...

I forgot to mention--the little white flower in the top picture. I have those growing all over my garden, too, but also in blue, and I always call them bluebells, but have no idea what the actual name is. But I love finding them in the garden, and it's always a surprise because they pop up on their own in the lawn, flower beds, growing in gravel around the edges of the house's foundation!

Beth said...

Everything looks so pretty with a bit of rain / dew!

Green Bean said...

@Pam - I mostly grow the borage to attract pollinators. Bees go crazy for it. The flowers are edible and popular for use in drinks and salads. They have a slightly cucumber-ish taste. I'm not a big fan but my son loves them. The leaves are also edible but, again, we don't really eat them.

@Athena - Thanks for "liking" me. :) Agreed on having borage strewn throughout the garden. It makes all the plants happy.

@Beth - Thank you!

Tanya @ Lovely Greens said...

I'm such an amazing Googler ;) Your white flower is a Oregon/N.Cali wildflower called a Fairybell - check out this link

Tanya @ Lovely Greens said...

Wartberry Fairybell to be exact :)

Green Bean said...

@Tanya - WOW! You are an amazing Googler! Thank you. I look at those little flowers so much differently now.

Chris said...

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Some of these flowers are mt first time to see. Most of them are looks like wild flower that's why we don't see this anywhere.

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youbee said...

That's nice that Borage grows SO well from seed and reseeds so easily, you only need to invest in one packet of borage seeds and you are set for life.I got some useful information from here.

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Farmer's Daughter said...

Just beautiful! We had a hard frost last night...

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