Wednesday, February 25, 2015

How To Provide Nesting Material for Birds in Your Garden

Although much of America is still buried under piles of snow, birds here in California have been busy building nests for the last month.  Because I want to encourage birds to nest nearby and increase them as visitors to our garden, I am happy to provide as much nesting material as possible.  Fortunately, it is easy and very inexpensive.


AVOID GARDEN CLEAN UP

Lazy gardeners rejoice!  When fall comes around, do not hasty to cut back perennials and dead annual stems.  Don't rake up the twigs and pine needles.  Leave the mulch alone.  Let grass clippings lie on your lawn. You are doing a service to local wildlife - not to mention your soil as the organic material will also enrich your soil as it decays.

Spider webs make great bird nest fodder!

Mulching with organic materials - above, pine needles - help the soil and provide nesting materials.  

NATIVE BUNCH GRASS


The robins' nest (above) fell from one of our trees during a windstorm last year.  As you can see, much of it is comprised of twigs and pine needles.  A fair amount of the bottom, though is from the native bunch grasses (below) that I put in a couple of years ago. 

California native "deer grass".

USE ORGANIC MATERIALS IN THE GARDEN

Last year, I made the decision to skip plastic garden tape and opt for twine.  To ditch the metal and plastic plant markers and use wooden popsicle sticks.  I wanted biodegradable-only materials in the garden.

I was glad of my decision when I watched finches gathering strands from last year's bean tepee twine for this year's nests.


STORE BOUGHT STUFFING

Three years ago (I kid you not!), I invested $5 in a ball of cotton batting from local birding store. We do not have snow here in California but we do (occasionally) have rain.  This fluff has remained on the tree year in and out and is used every year by birds building nests.

Just this January, I watched a mother hummingbird gathering material multiple times.  Unfortunately, I wasn't quick enough to get a good photo but you get the idea.


Even though it seems like a great reuse, do NOT offer dryer lint which can be harmful to birds.  


PET HAIR AND SCRAPS



Finally, you can pull together your small yarn scraps, bits of twine and pet hair.  Put them in a suet or peanut bird feeder or mesh bag and hang them on a tree.  Word of warning - pet hair is the most favorite of birds in our garden.  We've even have fights break out over it.  

By following these simple steps, you can welcome more wildlife into your garden.

This post is part of Tuesday Garden Party, Green Thumb Thursday, and Maple Hill Hop


Wednesday, February 4, 2015

When Green Living is a Labor of Love


You care about your kids' future.  Or the planet.  Or the open space and wildlife.  Or your health.  And so you decide to "go green".  You recycle more and shop less.  You use reusable bags and eat local food and bicycle.  You compost and grow a garden and bake your own bread and spend your time reading the back of deodorant bottles.

And at some point, it becomes, well, too much.

Green living should not be a chore.  By focusing on the fun stuff, we can stick with our positive lifestyle changes and, maybe, add more. If you are looking to extend your lighter living choices, here are a few things that the superheroes of the Green Phone Booth find irresistible.

Read the rest at The Green Phone Booth.

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...